Dragons vs Zeppelins

Call me Andal.
rufftoon:

paperseverywhere:

my tshirt design for the HTTYD2 contest at WeLoveFine. I’ll post the tshirt examples and the link to the ratings once it opens up at Aug 12! Otherwise, I hope you enjoy these cute dragons :)
also please check out the HQ version of this because I worked way too long on cleaning up that lineart XD

SO CUTE!

rufftoon:

paperseverywhere:

my tshirt design for the HTTYD2 contest at WeLoveFine. I’ll post the tshirt examples and the link to the ratings once it opens up at Aug 12! Otherwise, I hope you enjoy these cute dragons :)

also please check out the HQ version of this because I worked way too long on cleaning up that lineart XD

SO CUTE!

Schools of training in the horse world

unhappyhorses:

I’ve been thinking lately about the different kind of reactions I get to equine clicker training, and how I really have to tailor my responses to what I assume that person’s training background is. The world of equine training is extremely diverse, and I thought it would be interesting to sum up…

Johnnie Phelps, a woman sergeant in the army, thought, “There was a tolerance for lesbianism if they needed you. The battalion I was in was probably about ninety-seven percent lesbian.”
Sergeant Phelps worked for General Eisenhower. Four decades after Eisenhower had defeated the Axis powers, Phelps recalled an extraordinary event. One day, the general told her, “I’m giving you an order to ferret those lesbians out. We’re going to get rid of them.”
“I looked at him and then I looked at his secretary who was standing next to me, and I said, ‘Well, sir, if the general pleases, sir, I’ll be happy to do this investigation for you. But you have to know that the first name on the list will be mine.’ “
“And he was kind of taken aback a bit. And then this women standing next to me said, ‘Sir, if the General pleases, you must be aware that Sergeant Phelp’s name may be second, but mine will be first.”
“Then I looked at him, and said, ‘Sir, you’re right. They’re lesbians in the WAC battalion. And if the general is prepared to replace all the file clerks, all the section commanders, all the drivers-every woman in the WAC detachment-and there were about nine hundred and eighty something of us-then I’ll be happy to make that list. But I think the general should be aware that among those women are the most highly decorated women in the war. There have been no cases of illegal pregnancy. There have been no cases of AWOL. There have been no cases of misconduct. And as a matter of fact, every six months since we’ve been here, the general has awarded us a commendation for meritorious conduct.”
“And he said, ‘Forget the order.’”

The Gay Metropolis, page 47, Charles Kaiser (via bibliothekara)

Phelps tells this story herself in the excellent 1984 documentary Before Stonewall, which you can watch in its entirety on YouTube (she’s at 19:30, but really, watch the whole thing): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kX7AxQd82H8

(via theodoradove)


Anyone who wants to spin a yarn where Steve Rogers doesn’t know that teh gay exists? Come at me, bro.

(via jkthinkythoughts)

(via nellachronism)

  • Writer: I've planned and plotted this novel. I know what's going to happen, and I know my characters like the back of my hand.
  • Main character: Lol no
  • Writer: What - what are you doing. You aren't supposed to do that.
  • Main character: wanna do it
  • Side character: hey you don't mind if I ruin this thing do you
  • Writer: STOP IT.
  • Main character: brb gonna steel a boat lol
  • Writer: I MADE YOU DO AS I SAY.
  • Whole book: LOL NO.
lexxercise:

dresdencodak:

doggedlyjo:

dresdencodak:

Fair enough. I assume you mean when I started Dresden Codak? I’ll break down the honest-to-goodness process of the early comics:
Draw comics in mechanical pencil on the back of my statistics homework (never turned in) and then ink on top of that with a micron pen.
Sneak into the Honors College study room (from which I was expelled for poor grades) and use their scanner.
Use a mouse and a bootleg copy of Photoshop 7 to color the pages.
Upload it to my site, which at the time was flat HTML that I’d written from scratch.
And that’s it!

reblogging this for the reminder that grades and a college degree are by no means the be-all end-all of life. 

There’s some truth to this. I’d like to share some further biographical information:
I’m a college dropout. In 2006 I left school after a little over four years because I kept changing majors (physics, anthropology, computer science, then art) and it had reached a point where it was difficult for me to afford to keep going to school (I was paying my own way with various jobs).
The reason I had kept changing majors was because I was terrified that I’d picked the “wrong” career, with most of those academic decisions based around what careers seemed prestigious. I wanted to be an engineer because I liked the idea of being an engineer, then a programmer because I liked the idea of being a programmer, but I was never happy doing any of these things, and it showed. I’d always been groomed to be a good student, and for most of my career I was good at doing what I was told.
I’d always been creative, doing little projects on the side. I wrote a sci-fi novel when I was 19 (never shared it), some poems in physics class, and even some fake news stories about Popeye before I was kicked off the university paper. I also made films with friends for many years. I was told these were “good hobbies,” that once I became a respected and financially stable engineer/programmer/scientist, that I could then do what made me happy on the side. A nervous breakdown during my college career, however, made it clear that “waiting to be happy” was a psychologically unstable strategy. I couldn’t wait for someone else to grant me permission to do what I wanted with my life.
So, in 2005, during a statistics class that I would eventually fail, I started drawing Dresden Codak. I hadn’t seriously drawn in many years, but it’s something you don’t totally lose. They were pretty bad drawings, but I didn’t care. I enjoyed it and decided that doing what I really liked to do now was better than hoping I could do it later. I wasn’t looking for a career at the time, I just realized how much I loved making comics and knew that I should do whatever I could to keep making them. It took about a year for me to decided that being a cartoonist was what I really wanted. I changed my major to art briefly, but eventually accepted that paying for a degree wasn’t something that was going to help me at that point. 
After that, in 2006, I took a chance and dropped out. I worked an office job full time during the day while drawing Dresden Codak full time at night. I slept about 3 hours a night, but it didn’t matter. I was doing what I wanted, and it kept me going. Then, toward the end of 2007 I found out, through Topatoco, that I had enough readers to justify selling some merchandise. To my genuine surprise, as soon as we put the store up, I was making more money than my office job (which I promptly quit). From there I packed up, moved out of Alabama and never looked back.
Dresden Codak has been my full-time job ever since. It’s let me travel the country and meet amazing people while making a pretty comfortable living, but most importantly I get to do what I enjoy more than anything else. Ever since, I make all of my life decisions based on maximizing what I really want to do, and so far it’s served me well.
Don’t interpret this as an anti-education/college story or anything like that. I just think often we expect success if we do X, Y and Z, when in reality such a thing can’t be reliably handed to you by an authority. Start doing what you want to do now, because life’s far too short to wait around to be happy.

As soon as I saw this on my dash, I knew I had to share it with you guys. I feel like it’s so easy to see successful artists and get discouraged when you’re just starting out. To think that if you don’t have the same opportunities as they do, or access to a fancy degree, or professional tools, that you’ll never get there yourself.
The path to success and happiness is different for everyone. There is no formula—no magic tool or diploma that will get you there—and it might take longer to achieve for some than others.There is no age before or after which somehow legitimizes or delegitimizes your efforts; I’m on the cusp of 30 and still trying to figure things out. But it’s so important that you find a way to do what you love and what makes you happy. Even if it never becomes your job. Even if you can’t spend more than 10 minutes on it every day. Even if it only exists on the backs of napkins and scraps of paper. Even if no one else sees it but you.
-L

lexxercise:

dresdencodak:

doggedlyjo:

dresdencodak:

Fair enough. I assume you mean when I started Dresden Codak? I’ll break down the honest-to-goodness process of the early comics:

  1. Draw comics in mechanical pencil on the back of my statistics homework (never turned in) and then ink on top of that with a micron pen.
  2. Sneak into the Honors College study room (from which I was expelled for poor grades) and use their scanner.
  3. Use a mouse and a bootleg copy of Photoshop 7 to color the pages.
  4. Upload it to my site, which at the time was flat HTML that I’d written from scratch.

And that’s it!

reblogging this for the reminder that grades and a college degree are by no means the be-all end-all of life. 

There’s some truth to this. I’d like to share some further biographical information:

I’m a college dropout. In 2006 I left school after a little over four years because I kept changing majors (physics, anthropology, computer science, then art) and it had reached a point where it was difficult for me to afford to keep going to school (I was paying my own way with various jobs).

The reason I had kept changing majors was because I was terrified that I’d picked the “wrong” career, with most of those academic decisions based around what careers seemed prestigious. I wanted to be an engineer because I liked the idea of being an engineer, then a programmer because I liked the idea of being a programmer, but I was never happy doing any of these things, and it showed. I’d always been groomed to be a good student, and for most of my career I was good at doing what I was told.

I’d always been creative, doing little projects on the side. I wrote a sci-fi novel when I was 19 (never shared it), some poems in physics class, and even some fake news stories about Popeye before I was kicked off the university paper. I also made films with friends for many years. I was told these were “good hobbies,” that once I became a respected and financially stable engineer/programmer/scientist, that I could then do what made me happy on the side. A nervous breakdown during my college career, however, made it clear that “waiting to be happy” was a psychologically unstable strategy. I couldn’t wait for someone else to grant me permission to do what I wanted with my life.

So, in 2005, during a statistics class that I would eventually fail, I started drawing Dresden Codak. I hadn’t seriously drawn in many years, but it’s something you don’t totally lose. They were pretty bad drawings, but I didn’t care. I enjoyed it and decided that doing what I really liked to do now was better than hoping I could do it later. I wasn’t looking for a career at the time, I just realized how much I loved making comics and knew that I should do whatever I could to keep making them. It took about a year for me to decided that being a cartoonist was what I really wanted. I changed my major to art briefly, but eventually accepted that paying for a degree wasn’t something that was going to help me at that point.

After that, in 2006, I took a chance and dropped out. I worked an office job full time during the day while drawing Dresden Codak full time at night. I slept about 3 hours a night, but it didn’t matter. I was doing what I wanted, and it kept me going. Then, toward the end of 2007 I found out, through Topatoco, that I had enough readers to justify selling some merchandise. To my genuine surprise, as soon as we put the store up, I was making more money than my office job (which I promptly quit). From there I packed up, moved out of Alabama and never looked back.

Dresden Codak has been my full-time job ever since. It’s let me travel the country and meet amazing people while making a pretty comfortable living, but most importantly I get to do what I enjoy more than anything else. Ever since, I make all of my life decisions based on maximizing what I really want to do, and so far it’s served me well.

Don’t interpret this as an anti-education/college story or anything like that. I just think often we expect success if we do X, Y and Z, when in reality such a thing can’t be reliably handed to you by an authority. Start doing what you want to do now, because life’s far too short to wait around to be happy.

As soon as I saw this on my dash, I knew I had to share it with you guys. I feel like it’s so easy to see successful artists and get discouraged when you’re just starting out. To think that if you don’t have the same opportunities as they do, or access to a fancy degree, or professional tools, that you’ll never get there yourself.

The path to success and happiness is different for everyone. There is no formulano magic tool or diploma that will get you thereand it might take longer to achieve for some than others.There is no age before or after which somehow legitimizes or delegitimizes your efforts; I’m on the cusp of 30 and still trying to figure things out. But it’s so important that you find a way to do what you love and what makes you happy. Even if it never becomes your job. Even if you can’t spend more than 10 minutes on it every day. Even if it only exists on the backs of napkins and scraps of paper. Even if no one else sees it but you.

-L

zebrafeets-art:

I did these for my animal drawing final, but I figured they might be useful for someone here. YEY BEARS.

(via akeli)

diaemyung:

Free! x Pokemon (Click the images for larger size).

Story of Haruka and Feebas 

Haruka met Feebas when he was young. He finally evolved when Haru is Grade 12, but he was too big to stay at home. In the end, Haru decided to let him live in the sea. Milotic was very sad that he can’t stay with Haru and take a bath with him life before. So Haru stopped by sea everyday to see him. 

(via erin-tatertots)